HomePi – What we will build

As announced before with my post , I am doing my first blog series about building a sample DIY home automation for everyone to copy.

But what will we actually build?

The general idea behind this series is to show you which steps are needed to connect a google home to you raspberry Pi. It may sound like a small thing, but actually some components are involved

Read More

W3C rsiServer on github – automotive Web APIs made public

The World wide web consortium decided to create a standard for automotive APIs a few years back. Quite some discussion where going on about the technologies to choose for those APIs. While in the beginning a strong candidate was seen in a JavaScript API for automotive grade browsers which run on the so called IVI (in-vehicle-infotainment) systems, nowadays a more versatile API is the consortiums favourite.

With operating systems (OS) like Google Android or Apple iOS dominating the smartphone market and HTML5 and QT moving into the automotive infotainment world, an API is needed which allows to connect from any device and its OS to the actual vehicles API.

The APIs the W3C is designing will cover different domains. Of course accessing vehicle information from within or outside of the IVI unit is a must – we are talking about automotive APIs. Other areas of interest are location based services that would allow an application developer to access the vehicles navigation core, e.g. to feed destinations into it.

The discussions in the W3C automotive web platform group (https://www.w3.org/community/autowebplatform/) also brought up a REST interface approach that adds push to REST APIs. A reference implementation for a server is made public on github for everyone to play around with an contribute (https://github.com/wzr1337/rsiServer).

While REST APIs are familiar to most of the application developers from using web services nowadays, the approach is fairly uncommon but yet interesting for automotive applications. Especially added some push mechanism will allow application to listen for changes rather than polling them in. This is of course the key differentiator and yet a straight forward approach to make vehicle APIs usable for non-auto guys.

The expectation is to open up an eco system for applications similar to the mobile web APIs like GeoLocation did in recent years.

Copyright muckibu.de 2017
Tech Nerd theme designed by Siteturner