HomePi – connecting the Pi and the LED board

After setting up the LED board (HomePi – Starting with the LED board) and proving that it is actually working, it is now time to connect the Pi with the LED board. In this blog Post, we will talk about:

  • The Raspberry Pi GPIOs in general
  • How to connect the two devices
  • Download & use a software that allows to control the GPIOs/LEDs

First things first: The GPIOs

GPIO stands for General purpose input/output. We find them on the Raspberry Pi. A very good source of information is https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/usage/gpio/ where we find an image explaining the PIN numbering and location on the board.

The GPIO pins are a physical interface between the Pi and the outside world. At the simplest level, you might think of them as switches that you can turn on or off (input case) or that the Pi can turn on or off (output case).

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How to install NodeJS 8 on Raspberry Pi (using the ArmV6 package)

The is just a little “note” on how to install NodeJS on the RaspberryPi, as I was searching for the best way to do it my self several time, I decided to put this up for you guys (and me 😉 ) here to find it more easily..

First ssh into your Pi, then follow the procedure:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ mkdir Downloads
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ cd Downloads/
pi@raspberrypi:~/Downloads $ wget https://nodejs.org/dist/v8.9.0/node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l.tar.xz
--2017-11-05 11:57:20--  https://nodejs.org/dist/v8.9.0/node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l.tar.xz
...
Length: 10272460 (9.8M) [application/x-xz]
Saving to: 'node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l.tar.xz'
node-v8.9.0-linux-a 100%[===================>]   9.80M  1.20MB/s    in 7.7s 
...  
pi@raspberrypi:~/Downloads $ tar -xvf node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l.tar.xz
pi@raspberrypi:~/Downloads $ cd node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l/
pi@raspberrypi:~/Downloads/node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l $ sudo cp -R * /usr/local/
pi@raspberrypi:~/Downloads/node-v8.9.0-linux-armv6l $ cd
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ node -v
v8.9.0

You see, finally, we got no v8.9.0 on the Pi.

Stay tuned..

HomePi – Starting with the LED board

As discussed in earlier blog-posts, I will show you how to build an LED controller to be ultimately controlled by the Google Home device. This article is the first in the series that actually talks about the components and we will start with the LEDs connected to our RaspberryPi.

LEDs

First of all we need some electrical engineering fundamentals (based on https://electronicsclub.info/leds.htm):

I own several red and green LEDs, so I will use them for my demo. Every LED must have a resistor connected in series to limit the current flowing through the LED, to prevent it froming burning out instantly. The Resistor value can be calculated with a simple formular

R = (VS – VL) / I 

R = resistor value in ohms (ohm).
VS = supply voltage.
VL = LED voltage (2V generally, or 4V for blue and white LEDs).
I = LED current in amps (A)

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LA’s 10 Hottest Tech Incubators, Accelerators and Funding in general

I recently came across this article (http://pandodaily.com/2012/03/12/the-la-tech-scene-finally-moves-out-of-its-parents-basement/) which is mainly focussing on the Los Angeles Tech Scene. In the authors opinion the silicon valley is facing a competitive future. I absolutely agree with him except that it is not only LA taht is on the raise but also Germanies capital Berlin. Berlin hosts a lot of european startups, is a very good place to live for young, creative people and already have it’s “own” venture capital network.

What I find interesting most is the list of supporters Michael Carney has at the very end of his article:

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[Infographic] Geeks vs. Nerds

Stuck in a geeks world.. What does it mean? Actually there are “10” different characters that are not easy to seperate for the rest of the wolrd: Geeks and Nerds. But what’s the actual difference? An Infographic compiled by  http://www.mastersinit.org/ is explaining how to seperate them.

While Geeks are more likley to be found in positions like web developers or Entrepreneurs, Nerds are more often working as rocket scientists or reclusive professors. Both are likely to be IT professionals.

I don’t want to repeat all the figures, so just have a look to the infographic below: HostGator Promo Codes
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Udacity – how to build your own search engine over even a robotic car

Last year I successfully attended “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence” bay Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig. Sebastian and Peter are pioneers on the field of free online education and gave an awesome experience to a lot of online students.

A few days ago I received this Email from Sebastian asking to promote his latest venture udacity:

Hi Patrick,

Thank you for your interest in AI Class and congratulations to those who
successfully graduated. We were totally amazed that over 23,000 students
made it all the way to the end in a Stanford graduate-level class.

Due to popular demand, we are teaching a follow-up class: AI for Robotics at www.udacity.com . Also due to popular demand, we now have a programming environment, so you can develop and test software. Our
goal is to teach you to program a self-driving car in 7 weeks. This is a topic very close to my heart, and I am eager to share it with you. (This class builds on the concepts in ai-class, but ai-class is NOT required).

We are also launching an introduction to programming class, where students will learn to program a search engine, without any prior
knowledge of programming. This will be great for students new to computer science.

We are doing this with a new university: Udacity. In the next months, we will offer an entire computer science curriculum through Udacity, and offer certification services so that an entire degree can be obtained online.

I would love to see you in class again! I would also love if you could help us spread the word and recruit students. Udacity is an experiment in democratizing education, in making free education available for
everyone in the world. It can only succeed if you join us and help spread the word.

Sebastian

If you want to learn how to build your own search engine or how to build a robotic car, just register for the corresponing course on udacity.com.

Most expensive grafitti of all time through Facebook IPO

Usually graffiti artist are recognizedas vandals disturbing the world clean look with their Art. They are not known for being the smartest folks. But this view may change in a few days.

David Choe paintings at Facebooks first headquarter may be woth north of $200M in a few days without being sold. How this works?

The Artist took stock for paintings at the company’s headquarters instead of cash. His payout may be $200 million by Facebook IPO. Some other investors, especially the early ones, may even make billions of dollars.

Taking stocks may be one of the smartest move in terms of early art valuation in history. Other than regular artists of his guild do, the Choe had a bright foresight or may he just was the lucky winner of a smart bet.

When Google went to market with its $1.67 billion I.P.O. in 2004, hundreds of people joined the millionaire ranks, including secretaries, a company masseuse and a company chef. This time you can also count in a modern-day renegade artist who uses to put up party pics of himself spending enormous amounts of money on alcohol on his facebook page. Just recently he promoted photos of a $40.000 bottle of alcohol; a single shot is $888, much more than I sent on drinks for a whole party crowd usualy

Source:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/02/technology/for-founders-to-decorators-facebook-riches.html

How to fail keeping your companies talent

Whether it’s a high-profile tech company like Yahoo!, or a more established conglomerate like GE or Home Depot, large companies have a hard time keeping their best and brightest in house. Recently, GigaOM discussed the troubles at Yahoo! with a flat stock price, vested options for some of their best people, and the apparent free flow of VC dollars luring away some of their best people to do the start-up thing again.

Forbes just released their TOP10-List of “FAIL” in the sense of keeping talent:

1. Big Company Bureaucracy

2. Failing to Find a Project for the Talent that Ignites Their Passion

3. Poor Annual Performance Reviews

4. No Discussion around Career Development

5. Shifting Whims/Strategic Priorities

6. Lack of Accountability and/or telling them how to do their Jobs

7. Top Talent likes other Top Talent

8. The Missing Vision Thing

9. Lack of Open-Mindedness.

10. Who’s the Boss?

Top 50 “Best Places to Work” in Tech industry

Glassdoor, a career community to anonymously rate your company and CEOs,  released its annual Employees’ Choice Awards, listing the top 50 “Best Places to Work,” based on surveys collected from U.S. employees in 2011.

Google, Facebook and Rackspace are the best places to work in 2012 according to the survey. “More than 250,000 employees sounded off on what it’s like to work at more than 65,000 companies during the past year and shared the good, the bad and everything in between.” says the report.

An exerpt: “Smartest and most passionate people I have ever worked with. Company means so much to so many – humbled to be an employee here.” – Facebook Staffing (New York, NY)

Congratulations to all the 2012 Best Places to Work award winners!

AI-Class Grade calculator – let the machine do it

It’s not to hard for an AI-Class student to calculate her or his final score and the corresponding grade but having the machine do it for you is far more geeky.
I built a small calculator in Google docs, so feel free to use it for your grade estimation.

 

Just follow this link and find the calculator:

 

Ai-Class Grade calculator

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